‘Yu-Gi-Oh!’ creator died trying to save woman, young girl: report

‘Yu-Gi-Oh!’ creator died trying to save woman, young girl: report


A new report says “Yu-Gi-Oh!” creator Kazuki Takahashi’s July death came after he tried to save a child, woman and a U.S. soldier from a treacherous rip current off the coast of Japan.

Stars and Stripes on Wednesday reported that Takahashi did not die while snorkeling like initial reports said. Instead, Takahashi attempted to aid Maj. Robert Bourgeau in the rescue, “unbeknownst to the American, and drowned in the process, a pained Bourgeau told Stars and Stripes on Oct. 3.”

“You play that ‘what if’ game a lot,” Bourgeau said. “This guy had a huge impact on the world.”

Bourgeau managed to physically save the woman and child and was able to verbally guide the soldier to safety, the New York Post reports.

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Yu Gi Oh!, one of the top 10 toys children are expected to want for Christmas, on show at Dream Toys 2003. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, one of the best-selling toys from the 1980s, are also set to make a Christmas comeback, experts said. *  Toy shop bosses believe the fighting foursome will be among the top 10 presents children will be demanding this year. Another old-time favourite is Barbie through the sale of a “Swan Lake” version of the doll, according to the British Association of Toy Retailers (BATR).   (Photo by Ian West – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)
(Photo by Ian West – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)

The body of Takahashi, 60, was found floating about 330 yards off the coast of Okinawa, by a person running a marine leisure business, according to an official at the Naha Coast Guard Nago station.

The body showed signs of being attacked by a marine creature, possibly sharks, the official said.

Takahashi was identified after police in another part of Okinawa contacted the coast guard, saying a rented car had been found abandoned on a beach. The car had a driver’s license, confirming the identity. Takahashi’s real first name was Kazuo. His family was contacted and identified him, the coast guard official said.

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400963 51: Toy maker Mattel, Inc. debuted the new Yu Gi Oh figures at the International Toy Fair February 10, 2002 in New York. The figures and accessories depict scenes from the cartoons. (Photo by Lawrence Lucier/Getty Images)

400963 51: Toy maker Mattel, Inc. debuted the new Yu Gi Oh figures at the International Toy Fair February 10, 2002 in New York. The figures and accessories depict scenes from the cartoons. (Photo by Lawrence Lucier/Getty Images)

“Yu-Gi-Oh!” debuted in Shonen Jump magazine in 1996, became a hit, selling more than 40 million copies as manga, although the number of cards out in the world is far greater, in the billions.

The official card game went on sale in 1999. A TV show and video games, as well as figures and toys, were also part of the franchise.

The success of “Yu-Gi-Oh!” in the West was similar to that of other Japanese animation and game works like Pokémon.

A participant presents a bunch of Yu-Gi-Oh cards at the German Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game Championships in Schkeuditz, Germany, 18 May 2013. More than 800 players competed against each other to win the title of German champion of the Japanese card game. The best 32 players achieved a qualification for the European Championships at the end of June i n Frankfurt (Main). Photo: Hendrik Schmidt/dpa | usage worldwide   (Photo by Hendrik Schmidt/picture alliance via Getty Images)

A participant presents a bunch of Yu-Gi-Oh cards at the German Yu-Gi-Oh! Trading Card Game Championships in Schkeuditz, Germany, 18 May 2013. More than 800 players competed against each other to win the title of German champion of the Japanese card game. The best 32 players achieved a qualification for the European Championships at the end of June i n Frankfurt (Main). Photo: Hendrik Schmidt/dpa | usage worldwide   (Photo by Hendrik Schmidt/picture alliance via Getty Images)
(Photo by Hendrik Schmidt/picture alliance via Getty Images)

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“He’s a hero,” Bourgeau said of Takahashi. “He died trying to save someone else.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 





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